Seasons

November 10, 2012 - January 12, 2013

Selected Images  –  1 of 5
  • Bluhender-Weissdorn-Bonnieux-Vaucluse-2011
  • Bei-Lascaux-Bluhende-Pfirsichbaume-Montignac-Dordogne-2009
  • Umbauter Baum, Trier-Ehrang
  • Kartoffelacker im Oderbruch, Neuhardenberg, 2002
  • Feldgarten_im_Winter_Schwalmtal_Rheinland

Seasons

November 10, 2012 - January 12, 2013

Gallery Luisotti is pleased to announce the exhibition of Simone Nieweg: Seasons, featuring new works of Nieweg’s familiar, optically-charged European landscapes, including an image produced in her new, larger-scale format. As in her previous body of work, the artist continues to explore and highlight the colors naturally pertaining within the given framework of the scenery. Through this process, Nieweg vivifies, through the subtlest of visual measures, the uncommon from the unremarkable.

Through the past few decades, the photographed landscape has undergone a complete revision of values, in terms of what nature may simply look like as opposed to what it may say about the world at large. In this regard, Nieweg’s works are imagistic common ground for these two competing viewpoints. At once visually profuse of organic life while being steadfast in their documentary position, the immediacy of colors in the works start to separate from the photograph’s field, serving to intensify the work’s meaning as something broaching upon the study of light and colors. There is a tactile sense in the tangibility of the fruits and foliage that, through a manufactured embellishment, renders the scenes in the painter’s concern with the tactile. In what may otherwise be a seemingly quotidian range of the field to begin with, Nieweg subtly – yet palpably – instructs us of photography’s ability to borrow from other fields of art in her work.

A common acceptance of what the landscape is in our daily lives is that landscape is no more than a physical background of nature that we otherwise look past. Nieweg’s landscapes have a seeming fascination with this erstwhile prosaic, weighed full and ever-growing like the peaches and trees within her works. Looking deeper into each images show that they are not necessarily of nature as left to its own devices, nor a place of attentive cultivation. Being neither indebted to the withered aesthetics of nature as beauty, or to capturing images that equate landscape with that of an ever-marginalized prospect, Nieweg’s works are compelling in their own exacting way. Her works brim with the view of the personal, becoming documentations of physical beauty that could be more easily lost.